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4th International Workshop on Cognitive Information Processing

May 26-28, 2014     Bella Sky Hotel, Copenhagen, Denmark

Sonic Interaction Design in Experimental Music, Virtual Reality, Cultural Heritage and the Automotive Industry
Stefania Serafin Professor Stefania Serafin
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark
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Biography:

Stefania Serafin is currently Professor with special responsibilities in sound for multimodal environments at Aalborg University Copenhagen. She received a PhD degree in computer-based music theory and acoustics from Stanford University, in 2004, and a Master in Acoustics, computer science and signal processing applied to music from Ircam (Paris), in 1997. She has been a visiting professor at the University of Virginia (2003), and a visiting scholar at Stanford University (1999), Cambridge University (2002), and KTH Stockholm (2003). She was principal investigator for the EU funded project Natural Interactive Walking (FET Open), Digital Reworking of Electroacoustic Music (EU Culture 2000), and Danish delegate for the EU COST Actions on Sonic Interaction Design and Wood Music. Her main research interests include sound models for interactive systems, multimodal interfaces and virtual reality, and sonic interaction design.

Abstract:

Sonic interaction design is defined as the study and exploitation of sound as one of the principal channels conveying information, meaning, and aesthetic/emotional qualities in interactive contexts. This field lies at the intersection of interaction design and sound and music computing. In this talk I will first introduce the field of sonic interaction design. I will then present different ongoing projects taking place at the multisensory experience lab at Aalborg University in Copenhagen, where interactive sound plays an important role. These projects range from the use of interactive sound in virtual reality, to a current collaboration with the team of musician Imogen Heap in order to use her Gloves to control several physics based virtual instruments; to the use of sonic interaction in the reconstruction of old analogue instruments, to a current collaboration with Volvo and Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design, funded by the Danish Sound Technology Network, to investigate different forms of non visual (audio-haptic) feedback in cars.

Ear-EEG - A Novel Brain Monitoring Methodology
Preben Kidmose Professor Preben Kidmose
Department of Engineering, Aarhus University, Denmark
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Biography:

Preben Kidmose received the B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from University of Southern Denmark (Engineering College) in 1995, the M.Sc. degree in engineering from Technical University of Denmark in 1998, and the Ph.D. degree in signal processing from Technical University of Denmark in 2001. From 2001 - 2011 he was employed by Widex A/S, Denmark, as R&D engineer within hearing aids and medical devices. He is currently Professor (Ingeniørdocent) in biomedical engineering at Department of Engineering at Aarhus University. His areas of interest include signal processing and machine learning in medical devices and for audio processing, medical instrumentation and sensors, and system engineering/design of medical devices.

Preben Kidmose Professor Danilo Mandic
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, United Kingdom
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Biography:

Dr. Danilo Mandic is a professor in Signal Processing at Imperial College London. He has been working in the area of nonlinear adaptive signal processing, nonlinear dynamics, and data/sensor fusion. His publication record includes two research monographs (Recurrent Neural Net­works for Prediction, and Complex Valued Nonlinear Adaptive Filters) with Wiley, an edited book on Signal Processing for Information Fusion (Springer 2008), and more than 200 publications in Signal and Image Processing. He has been a Member of the IEEE Technical Committee on Machine Learning for Signal Processing, Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems II, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, and International Journal of Mathematical Modelling and Algorithms. Dr. Mandic has produced award winning papers and products resulting from his collaboration with Industry.


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Abstract:

We have proposed and investigated a method for brain monitoring based on measuring electroencephalographic (EEG) signals from electrodes placed in-the-ear (ear-EEG). The ear-EEG recording methodology provides a non-invasive, discreet and unobtrusive way of measuring electrical brain signals and we believe that it has great potential as an enabling method for brain monitoring in everyday life. We have demonstrated that both steady state and transient responses can be obtained from ear-EEG, and that these responses have similar characteristics and quality compared to EEG obtained from conventional on-scalp recordings. The objective of the talk is to 1) present the ear-EEG methodology; 2) present results we have obtained from the characterization of the ear-EEG signals, and in comparative studies between ear-EEG and conventional on-scalp EEG recordings; 3) elaborate on some of the advantages of the technology and discuss potential applications.

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